L’orchestre D’hibernation Animaux - How Animals Hibernate

What if hibernating animals of different species formed an orchestra and performed a symphony about their winter’s sleep? Well, they did—sort of.

Because this is the science version of "Peter and the Wolf"... A flute playing wood frog who freezes. A bassoon blowing painted turtle who (ahem) breathes through its butt. A trumpet blasting common poorwill who falls asleep anywhere, anytime. A harp plucking mosquito who goes into a sci-fi suspended animation. A drum thumping black bear who stays fat all winter long. And, of course, a theremin tuning Antarctic cod who goes semi-comatose in the dark.

Ladies and gentlemen, "The Sleep Cycle" by L’orchestre D’hibernation Animaux.

credits :: Tom McNamara :: Director. Producer. Editor. Animator ::

*2018 Jackson Hole Science Media Award finalist :: Vimeo Staff Pick :: Wild & Scenic Film Festival selection :: International Wildlife Film Festival selection

video made for Popular Science :: PopSci has been a leading source of science and technology news since its inception in 1872 ::

       
     
EXPERIMENTALS : NAUTILUSES

What do you see when you picture a nautilus? On the surface, it's a beautifully strange shelled cephalopod. But look closer... Our story starts with Act 1, an ode to the nautilus' 500 million year old brain, nose, and its tentacle like cirri. Because the nautilus doesn't need to see. After all, it experiences the world by smelling and feeling it. Act 2 looks inside the nautilus' shell and finds the cephalopod has something in common with Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan and disease research. Finally, in Act 3, Captain Nemo's Nautilus ship leads to Popular Science's true blue discovery of the lost first underwater film. It's a story too strange and horrifying to be fiction (and, yes, it involves a dead horse floating upside-down in the ocean).

The *Experimentals video series features three science stories on an always curiously interpreted theme. And it’s made as if it's an 80s educational TV show you half remember.

credits :: Tom McNamara :: Series creator. Director. Producer. Editor. Animator ::

video made for Popular Science :: PopSci has been a leading source of science and technology news since its inception in 1872 ::

       
     
146 Years of Popular Science

This is what the universe looks like after 146 years of Popular Science—a video timeline of weird, wild, and wondrous moments in science history. And it’s all animated with 146 years of PopSci covers, photos, and illustrations.

credits :: Tom McNamara :: Producer :: Jason Drakeford :: Animator ::

video made for Popular Science :: PopSci has been a leading source of science and technology news since its inception in 1872 ::

       
     
The Coincidental Geometry of a Total Solar Eclipse (Popular Science)

A total solar eclipse is both chance and certainty. And there's something kind of beautiful about that. (August 2017)

credits :: Tom McNamara :: Director. Producer. Editor. Camera :: 

*video has over 170,000 views

video made for Popular Science :: PopSci has been a leading source of science and technology news since its inception in 1872 ::

       
     
The Assassination of Albert Einstein

Why E=mc^2 became famous for all the wrong reasons, and how Albert Einstein actually isn't the father of the atomic bomb. Also: time travel and hypothetical assassinations. 

credits :: Tom McNamara :: Director. Producer. Editor. Camera :: 

*video has over 297,000 views

video made for Popular Science :: PopSci has been a leading source of science and technology news since its inception in 1872 ::

       
     
Where to live in America, 2100 A.D.

Season after season, extreme weather bombards the continental United States. Over the next 83 years, its cascading effects will force U.S. residents inward, upward, and away from newly uninhabitable areas. But don’t worry: here's a map of how these factors will alter the country’s landscape in 2100.

credits :: Tom McNamara :: Director. Producer. Editor. Camera :: 

*video has over 430,000 views

video made for Popular Science :: PopSci has been a leading source of science and technology news since its inception in 1872 ::

       
     
Siri talks to HAL 9000 about A.I. sexism

Siri and Alexa vs. HAL 9000 and Watson. The voices of artificial intelligence face off about sexism and gender roles. Or: sexA.I.sm.

Science fiction has shaped the aesthetics and sounds of tech today. So, here's a question: what if Apple's Siri talked to 2001: A Space Odyssey's HAL 9000? The subject: why Siri, Alexa, and Google Assistant have feminine voices and why HAL - not to mention, IBM's Watson - talk like guys.

credits :: Tom McNamara :: Director. Producer. Editor. Camera :: 

video made for Popular Science :: PopSci has been a leading source of science and technology news since its inception in 1872 ::

       
     
Rockets' Red Glare

Have you ever wondered what the rockets in “rockets’ red glare and bombs bursting in air” actually are? What were rockets in 1814 - when the Star Spangled Banner was written?

credits :: Tom McNamara :: Director. Producer. Editor. Camera :: 

video made for Popular Science :: PopSci has been a leading source of science and technology news since its inception in 1872 ::

       
     
The Search for the Extinct Tasmanian Tiger

Dear viewers: The extinct Tasmanian tiger of Australia is still extinct, yet, there’ve been a string of “plausible” sightings of the long gone marsupial. Here's how you can be prepared should you ever encounter an extinct beast.

credits :: Tom McNamara :: Director. Producer. Editor. Camera :: 

video made for Popular Science :: PopSci has been a leading source of science and technology news since its inception in 1872 ::

       
     
A Stop Motion History of the American Pickup Truck

How the pickup truck evolved from a Model T hack into the best selling automobile in America. 

credits :: Tom McNamara :: Producer. Editor. Camera. Animation. ::

video made for Popular Science :: PopSci has been a leading source of science and technology news since its inception in 1872 ::